Candidates, Contributions & Compliance in Connection with New Jersey’s 2017 Gubernatorial Election

On Tuesday, June 6th, New Jersey held its 2017 gubernatorial primary election. Voters went to the polls to choose the Republican and Democratic candidates for Governor. Now that we know that the general election will feature a race between Phil Murphy and Kim Guadagno, here are a few campaign-finance and pay-to-play reminders to keep in mind as you decide how you would like to participate:

  • If your company holds New Jersey State government contracts or would like to remain eligible for New Jersey State government contracts in the future, you should limit your corporate contribution to a gubernatorial candidate to no more than $300 per election per candidate.
    • Compliance Tip – Regardless of how your company is organized, contributions by your company’s shareholders, officers, equity partners, equity members and the spouses, resident children and civil union partners of these individuals may impact your company’s eligibility for State government contracts.
  • If remaining eligible for New Jersey State government contracts is not a concern, and your company is organized as a corporation, your company may contribute up to $4,300 per election per candidate.
    • Compliance Tip – Please note that affiliated corporations may share a contribution limit.
  • If your company is organized as a corporation, shareholders, officers and directors enjoy individual contribution limits that are separate from the limit enjoyed by the company.
    • Compliance Tip – Please note that certain regulated-industry companies may not contribute with corporate funds, but individual officers and directors may participate individually.
  • If your company is organized as a partnership or limited liability company, your company may not contribute as an entity, but each partner or member is entitled to his or her own limit.
    • Compliance Tip – If your contribution is drawn upon a partnership or limited liability company check, be sure to follow the allocation rules set forth under NJ campaign finance law.
  • Even though the primary election was held two days ago, any contribution received thru June 23rd counts toward your 2017 primary election limit. So, if you already maxed out in connection with the primary, you should wait until June 24th to write your next check. On the flip side, if you have yet to contribute (and would like to), you still have time!
    • Compliance Tip – To help properly track your contribution with the relevant election cycle, use the memo line of  your check and review relevant ELEC reports to make sure your contribution was reported in connection with the appropriate election.

Tuesday’s primary made it clear that New Jersey’s 2017 election season is now in high-gear! As we head into the summer months, it is the perfect time to focus on political-activity compliance.

Deadline for New Jersey’s Annual Pay-to-Play Disclosure is Approaching: Is Your Company Ready to File?

After ELEC sent out its reminder email on March 6, we are reproducing below a Genova Burns LLC client alert that was distributed last week for any potential filers who may require additional information about the annual pay-to-play disclosure.

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission (“ELEC”) requires each business entity that received payments of $50,000 or more (in the aggregate) as a result of government contracts during the 2016 calendar year to electronically file a Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE“) with ELEC no later than Thursday, March 30, 2017.

The obligation to file arises whenever payments from New Jersey government entities reach the $50,000 threshold. This includes contracts with the State of New Jersey Executive and Legislative branches, counties, municipalities, boards of education, fire districts, and independent authorities, regardless of method of award.

Additionally, detailed contract and contribution information must be disclosed whenever the business entity or a covered individual made a “reportable” contribution during 2016. A contribution is “reportable” when it exceeds $300 per reporting period. In light of these requirements, it is necessary to review personal political contributions made by a business entity’s partners, officers, and directors (and certain members of their families). Additionally, because of varying election cycles, it may be necessary to review contributions made over the course of several years to determine whether any 2016 contributions are reportable.

Companies that fail to file on time may be subject to monetary penalties. To ensure a timely and accurate filing, companies that have yet to begin preparing Form BE should not delay.

Genova Burns LLC can help your company comply with the Form BE filing requirements. Contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq., Chair of the Corporate Political Activity Law Group, at rfreed@genovaburns.com or 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at akelin@genovaburns.com or 973-646-3267.

Calling all New Jersey Government Contractors: What is your Plan for Political Activity Compliance in Anticipation of the 2017 Gubernatorial Election?

With only 19 days until the presidential election and the final debate being held tonight, most of the country is focused on national politics. Although the presidential election may be taking center stage, now is the time for companies to focus on their New Jersey political-activity compliance.

We are currently within the 18-month period before the inauguration of New Jersey’s next governor, which means that a contribution made today may impact your company’s eligibility for contracts with the State of New Jersey for years to come. If your company or even one covered individual (including officers, shareholders, equity partners or their spouses, civil-union partners and resident children) contributes more than $300 to a gubernatorial candidate or certain other political recipients, your company could be declared ineligible for contracts with the State of New Jersey through January of 2022!

Focusing on political-activity compliance is important for all companies, but it is especially important if your company has recently gone through a merger, conducted a re-organization, hired new officers or partners, promoted individuals within your company to new roles or simply needs a refresher. If you have no policy is place, it is not too late to adopt one before New Jersey’s gubernatorial election kicks into full swing and you find yourselves ineligible to compete for government-contracting opportunities.

Independence, Coordination & Super PACs in the 2016 Presidential Election

Yesterday we celebrated Independence Day. In the next three weeks, the Nation will focus on the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. We cannot turn on the television without catching a political ad. Some ads will be run by the candidates themselves. Based on recent reports filed with the Federal Election Commission (“FEC”), there is a good chance that many ads will be run by Super PACs.

Although Super PACs are required to disclose their donors, it is not always clear who is behind a Super PAC ad and whether a Super PAC is truly independent from a candidate, a party or their agents. The FEC has, therefore, adopted a three-prong test to determine whether a Super PAC is acting independently and is, therefore, entitled to receive unlimited contributions.

Under the FEC’s coordination test, when an election-related communication (content prong) has been paid for by a third-party (payment prong), the FEC will ask the following questions (conduct prong) to determine whether the ad was coordinated:

  • Was the communication created, produced or distributed at the request or suggestion of the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Was the candidate, party committee or their agents materially involved in decisions related to the ad’s content, intended audience, mode of communications, etc.?
  • Were there substantial discussions between the Super PAC and the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Does the Super PAC share a common vendor with the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Does the Super PAC employ an employee or independent contractor who worked for the candidate or party committee during the previous 120 days?

Because proving an ad was not coordinated, isn’t always as easy as 1-2-3, it is not too late for Super PACs involved in the 2016 presidential election to develop policies, procedures and protocols to help protect against potential allegations of coordination.

Corporate Political Activity, Reputational Risk Management and the 2016 Federal Election

As the 2016 presidential primary season concludes, we are quickly approaching the summer conventions and the November presidential election. With the political contests becoming more heated, this post is part of a new series on what different entities and groups need to know about their political activity as the 2016 election approaches.

The 2016 presidential election poses unique challenges for companies and organizations. As we discussed here and here, both for-profit and not-for-profit corporations need to be mindful of their involvement in the electoral process. Corporations also need to make sure that their employees are not improperly using corporate resources for individual political activity. While it is easy to develop a policy prohibiting employees from using copy machines, conference rooms and other organizational resources in connection with federal political activity, it is not as easy to measure the potential reputational risk associated with their activity.

What if the CEO of the company decides to hold a political fundraiser for one candidate over the other?

The CEO of Intel “took heat” over an event that he was planning to host for Donald Trump. The event ultimately got canceled because customers were questioning whether the event signaled that Intel supported Donald Trump.

What if your organization decides to support one candidate over another by participating in independent expenditure activity?

Target faced backlash in 2011 when it supported an organization that in turn supported a candidate that many considered a bigot. The support drew criticism from customers, celebrities with products in Target stores and shareholders alike.

What if your connected federal PAC fails to get shareholder approval before making political contributions?

Corporations need to determine whether their company will suffer negative consequences if their connected federal PAC makes contributions to candidates that do not support the corporation’s overall goals and mission.

Many of these consequences are difficult to predict – it is not always clear at the outset how a decision to participate in an election as an individual, through independent expenditures or through a connected  corporate PAC will ultimately impact your organization and its reputation. Although hindsight is always 20/20, corporations need to be forward thinking so they do not find themselves at the center of political controversy.

New Jersey’s 2016 Primary: Potential Pitfalls of Per Election & Pay-to-Play Limits

New Jersey held its 2016 primary election on Tuesday, June 7, 2016. While most of the focus has been on the presidential primary, individuals and entities that contribute in connection with New Jersey state and local elections need to keep the following in mind:

  • New Jersey campaign finance law sets “per election” limits for contributions to candidate committees; however, the limit does not automatically reset the day after the primary election. Rather, the 2016 primary election cycle remains open until Friday, June 24, 2016 (candidates are required to file a 20-day post-election report with ELEC on Monday, June 27, 2016). So, any contribution made between the primary election and June 24, 2016 will count toward the 2016 primary and not the 2016 general. This is an important consideration if a contributor is concerned with pay-to-play compliance and wants to limit contributions to a particular candidate to no more than $300 per election.
    • If a contributor wants a contribution to count toward the 2016 primary, the contributor should make sure that the check arrives before June 24, 2016 and that the recipient committee will report the contribution in connection with the 2016 primary.
    • If a contributor wants a contribution to count toward the 2016 general, the contributor should wait to send the check after the June 24 “cut off” date to avoid any confusion (and the possibility of exceeding a pay-to-play limit).
  • New Jersey campaign finance law sets “per calendar” year limits for contributions to party committees, PACs and legislative leadership committees. So, if a contributor is concerned with pay-to-play compliance and wants to limit contributions to $300 or less, the limit does not re-set now that the primary is over.
  • Some New Jersey pay-to-play ordinances set “per calendar year,” “per contract” or “per election cycle” limits for contributions to candidates. Some even prohibit contributions in any amount during certain periods of time. So, if your company does business with a particular county or municipality or wishes to remain eligible for future contracts with a particular county or municipality, do not assume that because the 2016 primary election is over, it is now safe to write another check.

Less Than One Month: NJ ELEC Broadens Annual Pay-to-Play Form & Requires Companies to Disclose Additional Information

Recent changes in the annual filing requirement for companies doing business with local, county or state government in New Jersey may make the process for completing this year’s ELEC Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE”) more complicated and time consuming. Although ELEC has yet to issue guidance on these additional requirements, government vendors must still electronically file the disclosure form by the March 30 submission deadline.

In effect since 2006, Form BE requires every company that receives payments of $50,000 or more from New Jersey government entities to disclose those contracts as well as its reportable New Jersey political contributions. All businesses that receive such payments must file regardless of whether the company or certain associated people have made any reportable contributions, but the level of detail required by Form BE depends on whether you have any contributions to report.

There are two new requirements for the 2015 reporting year (due March 30):

  • Fair-and-Open Check Box Requirement: Check a box to indicate whether each contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process”; and
  • Certification Requirement: Certify that the statements and/or information contained in Form BE are true and acknowledge that if any of the statements or information are willfully false that you may be subject to punishment.

Expect completing your 2015 Form BE to be more time consuming than in the past. Here are some obstacles to be on the alert for:

  • Businesses may find it challenging and time consuming to identify whether a contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process” given that your 2015 Form BE may cover long-term contracts that could very well have been awarded years ago.
  • In many cases it will be unclear how vendors should classify Executive Branch contracts awarded pursuant to a competitive process because the phrase “fair-and-open process” is a term of art with respect to county, municipal and legislative contracts.
  • In past years, ELEC asked the person filing Form BE to simply “acknowledge” that he or she was familiar with the information contained in the Form BE. Now, ELEC is asking the person filing Form BE to certify to the accuracy of the statement and to acknowledge that he or she may be subject to punishment for willfully false information.

Pay-to-Play Resolutions

As we approach the end of the first work week of 2016, companies should be thinking about their “pay-to-play resolutions” in the upcoming year. New Jersey is home to numerous and varied pay-to-play restrictions. One misstep can have severe consequences. New Jersey’s pay-to-play restrictions may make your head spin, but any company that does business (or wants to do business) with the New Jersey government needs to make compliance with these laws part of its 2016 business plan.

Although many companies think that they have their political activity compliance program under control, companies often ignore these key facts:

  1. The laws change;
  2. Similar laws are often interpreted differently; and
  3. Those covered by pay-to-play restrictions within your organization may change from year to year as people join your team, leave your team or change positions within your company.

As 2012 came to a close, we discussed 2013 Pay-to-Play Resolutions. Given, however, that we are now in a Presidential election year and New Jersey’s gubernatorial election is not far behind, it is important to address pay-to-play resolutions once again. As we enter this busy political season with many hotly contested issues (and races), thinking that individuals within your company are going to sit on the sidelines is not realistic. If you are a government contractor (or hope to be one in the future), now is the perfect time to make the adoption of a meaningful political activity compliance program a key part of your list of New Year’s resolutions.

 

Public-Private Partnerships and Pay-to-Play in New Jersey: “P3s and P2P in the Garden State”

Public-Private Partnerships (commonly known as “P3s”) are very popular across the country, including the recently announced renovations at LaGuardia Airport as one example. P3s are also gaining significant attention here in New Jersey. Although P3s have thus far been focused on educational settings in New Jersey, there is potential for this funding method to be used for a wide variety of projects ranging from infrastructure to transportation.

P3s are often touted as a solution for economic growth and development because a private entity steps in to fill a funding gap that is not being filled by the government. Because, however, P3s require a private entity to “partner” with the government, private entities that are interested in participating in P3s need to be mindful of New Jersey’s pay-to-play restrictions, which limit a business entity’s eligibility for government contracts or agreements based on political contributions. For example, if a private entity wants to enter into a public-partnership with the State of New Jersey, the private entity needs to make sure that the entity and certain associated individuals (such as the entity’s officers and owners) have not made “reportable” contributions (a contribution greater than $300) to a New Jersey gubernatorial candidate, political party committee or legislative leadership committee within certain periods of time that may range from 18 months to 5 ½ years. If a private entity wants to partner with the government at the local level, the entity will need to certify compliance with local pay-to-play restrictions, which may contain an absolute ban on contributions (in any amount) and may also cover contributions to PACs that provide support to local candidates and party committees.

Although pay-to-play compliance is often the last piece of the “P3” puzzle, it cannot be overlooked. If a private entity cannot certify compliance with New Jerseys pay-to-play restrictions, this failure may result in significant delays or may even render the private entity ineligible for the project. As businesses explore new opportunities to work with the government, they will have to keep in mind that their political contributions may affect eligibility for P3s and other contracting opportunities.

What is a Super PAC?

The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire has reported that in the first half of 2015, presidential Super PACs have raised a total of $211,457,755. This money is in addition to money raised directly by presidential candidate committees and does not include money raised by 501(c)(4) entities that might be involved in the political process.

Since Citizens United was decided in 2010, Super PACs have been a hot topic. Despite all of the press and discussion, it seems that confusion still surrounds Super PACs. So, we decided to go back to the basics:

  • A Super PAC is an independent-expenditure-only committee, which means that it can only spend its money on expenditures that are not coordinated with candidates.
  • A Super PAC may not make contributions to candidate committees.
  • A Super PAC may raise unlimited funds.
  • A Super PAC is required to disclose its donors.
  • A Super PAC may be registered with the IRS, the FEC or a state election commission (depending on the nature of the Super PAC’s focus and activities).
  • A Super PAC may be required to file reports with more than one government entity (depending on the nature and timing of its activities).

 

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