Candidates, Contributions & Compliance in Connection with New Jersey’s 2017 Gubernatorial Election

On Tuesday, June 6th, New Jersey held its 2017 gubernatorial primary election. Voters went to the polls to choose the Republican and Democratic candidates for Governor. Now that we know that the general election will feature a race between Phil Murphy and Kim Guadagno, here are a few campaign-finance and pay-to-play reminders to keep in mind as you decide how you would like to participate:

  • If your company holds New Jersey State government contracts or would like to remain eligible for New Jersey State government contracts in the future, you should limit your corporate contribution to a gubernatorial candidate to no more than $300 per election per candidate.
    • Compliance Tip – Regardless of how your company is organized, contributions by your company’s shareholders, officers, equity partners, equity members and the spouses, resident children and civil union partners of these individuals may impact your company’s eligibility for State government contracts.
  • If remaining eligible for New Jersey State government contracts is not a concern, and your company is organized as a corporation, your company may contribute up to $4,300 per election per candidate.
    • Compliance Tip – Please note that affiliated corporations may share a contribution limit.
  • If your company is organized as a corporation, shareholders, officers and directors enjoy individual contribution limits that are separate from the limit enjoyed by the company.
    • Compliance Tip – Please note that certain regulated-industry companies may not contribute with corporate funds, but individual officers and directors may participate individually.
  • If your company is organized as a partnership or limited liability company, your company may not contribute as an entity, but each partner or member is entitled to his or her own limit.
    • Compliance Tip – If your contribution is drawn upon a partnership or limited liability company check, be sure to follow the allocation rules set forth under NJ campaign finance law.
  • Even though the primary election was held two days ago, any contribution received thru June 23rd counts toward your 2017 primary election limit. So, if you already maxed out in connection with the primary, you should wait until June 24th to write your next check. On the flip side, if you have yet to contribute (and would like to), you still have time!
    • Compliance Tip – To help properly track your contribution with the relevant election cycle, use the memo line of  your check and review relevant ELEC reports to make sure your contribution was reported in connection with the appropriate election.

Tuesday’s primary made it clear that New Jersey’s 2017 election season is now in high-gear! As we head into the summer months, it is the perfect time to focus on political-activity compliance.

Is New Jersey’s Regulated-Industry Ban on Political Contributions Ripe for Challenge?

Since 1911, New Jersey law has prohibited the making of political contributions by such highly regulated industries as banks, utilities, and insurance companies. The reasoning underlying this prohibition was clarified by a New Jersey Attorney General Advisory Opinion, which explained that these “[c]omprehensive regulatory programs, vital to the protection of the public, could become prime targets of elected officials seeking to satisfy perceived debts to corporate benefactors affiliated within a regulated industry.” For more than a century, this law has remained in effect. But new legal developments raise questions about the constitutional validity of this ban on regulated-industry political contributions.

In early May of 2017, in Free and Fair Election Fund, et al. v. Missouri Ethics Commission, et al., the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri declared unconstitutional a provision of Missouri campaign-finance law that prohibited banks, insurance companies, and telephone companies from making any political contributions to PACs. (Missouri law already prohibitions all contributions to candidates and political parties from corporations, without regard to whether the corporations in engaged in a heavily regulated industry.) The court determined that this complete ban on contributions from heavily regulated industries is unconstitutional because the law was not closely drawn to avoid abridging First Amendment rights to engage in the political process. This decision was based in part on the U.S. Supreme Court’s recognition that “there is not the same risk of quid pro quo corruption or its appearance when money flows through independent actors to a candidate, as when a donor contributes to a candidate directly.” In this case, making contributions to PACs did not give rise to the same risks of quid pro quo corruption or the appearance thereof because the PACs were independent entities that could determine for themselves how to use funds received from a contributor. This lessened risk was not reason, in the eyes of the court, to prohibit certain corporations from participating in the political process.

This issue is far from settled, as Missouri’s Attorney General announced that he will appeal the court’s decision, and there are key differences between New Jersey’s regulated-industry ban and Missouri’s regulated-industry ban and New Jersey campaign-finance law and Missouri campaign-finance law.  However, the Free and Fair Election Fund decision begs the question whether New Jersey’s regulated-industry ban is ripe for challenge.

 

Is the Time Ripe for New Jersey Pay-to-Play Reform?

For more than a decade, New Jersey has had in place a series of pay-to-play laws that impose reduced contribution limits and heightened disclosure requirements for government contractors. The goal of these laws is to ensure fair contracting procedures and to remove favoritism from the procurement process.

But are these laws working as intended when seemingly innocent mistakes leading to relatively small political contributions remove otherwise qualified and competitive bidders from government contracts? News last month that a paving company was disqualified from $7 million in New Jersey Executive Branch contracts because of a $500 political contribution has government contractors throughout the State understandably concerned about their own compliance procedures. The disproportionate effect of a relatively small political contribution has highlighted the need to reform New Jersey’s pay-to-play laws.

And Jeff Brindle, the Executive Director of the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission, agrees. The need for reform is not a new issue, but the dramatic nature of this ineligibility determination may provide the impetus to begin this process in earnest.

In the current legal landscape and a blockbuster New Jersey election year that will see the election of a new governor as well as 120 State legislative races, government contractors need to focus on their pay-to-play compliance. Merely assuming that you are in compliance is simply not good enough, when a contribution of only a few hundred dollars can disqualify your company from millions of dollars of contracts. At this point in the election cycle, even one unintentional contribution can disqualify your company for up to 5 ½ years and, starting in April, refunds will not cure an excessive contribution once we have entered the 60 days preceding the 2017 primary election.

Genova Burns LLC has been at the forefront of pay-to-play compliance since New Jersey’s law was enacted more than a decade ago. If you are unsure of your compliance procedures, Genova Burns LLC can assist you in navigating the current legal landscape as well as any reforms that the future may bring. If you have any questions or would like to discuss your pay-to-play compliance program, please contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq. at 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at 973-646-3267.

Deadline for New Jersey’s Annual Pay-to-Play Disclosure is Approaching: Is Your Company Ready to File?

After ELEC sent out its reminder email on March 6, we are reproducing below a Genova Burns LLC client alert that was distributed last week for any potential filers who may require additional information about the annual pay-to-play disclosure.

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission (“ELEC”) requires each business entity that received payments of $50,000 or more (in the aggregate) as a result of government contracts during the 2016 calendar year to electronically file a Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE“) with ELEC no later than Thursday, March 30, 2017.

The obligation to file arises whenever payments from New Jersey government entities reach the $50,000 threshold. This includes contracts with the State of New Jersey Executive and Legislative branches, counties, municipalities, boards of education, fire districts, and independent authorities, regardless of method of award.

Additionally, detailed contract and contribution information must be disclosed whenever the business entity or a covered individual made a “reportable” contribution during 2016. A contribution is “reportable” when it exceeds $300 per reporting period. In light of these requirements, it is necessary to review personal political contributions made by a business entity’s partners, officers, and directors (and certain members of their families). Additionally, because of varying election cycles, it may be necessary to review contributions made over the course of several years to determine whether any 2016 contributions are reportable.

Companies that fail to file on time may be subject to monetary penalties. To ensure a timely and accurate filing, companies that have yet to begin preparing Form BE should not delay.

Genova Burns LLC can help your company comply with the Form BE filing requirements. Contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq., Chair of the Corporate Political Activity Law Group, at rfreed@genovaburns.com or 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at akelin@genovaburns.com or 973-646-3267.

Plainfield Repeals Local Pay-to-Play Ordinance

New Jersey is home to a multitude of overlapping pay-to play laws. The State has a default statute covering pay-to-play restrictions at the municipal level. In 2006, however, the State Legislature allowed municipalities to craft their own pay-to-play ordinances further restricting certain political contributions from vendors. Although these local ordinances are supposed to be “consistent with the themes” of New Jersey’s statewide pay-to-play restrictions, variations exist among the local ordinance in effect in more than 100 municipalities across the State.

As of last week, the number of municipalities with local pay-to-play ordinances in effect dropped by one when, in a 4-3 vote, the Plainfield Municipal Council voted to repeal its 2011 pay-to-play ordinance. Until recently, Plainfield had a stringent pay-to-play ordinance in effect. Under the old ordinance, covered contributors were subject to reduced contribution limits for municipal candidates and political party committees, as well as for county political party committees and PACs that regularly engage in the support of Plainfield municipal or Union county elections. Additionally, all contributions were prohibited once negotiations for a contract began. Without the ordinance, the State’s default pay-to-play laws will be in force in Plainfield. This means, if the City of Plainfield awards contracts pursuant to a “fair and open” process, vendors may contribute up to $2,600 per election to a candidate for Plainfield municipal office. If, however, the City of Plainfield does not use a “fair and open” process, vendors must adhere to the reduced pay-to-play limit of $300 per election to a candidate for or holder of Plainfield municipal office and $300 per calendar year to a Plainfield municipal party committee.

Proponents of the repeal argue that this will bring more transparency to the political process by encouraging direct contributions to candidates and party committees instead of PACs (a sentiment that echoes ELEC’s recent calls to revisit the State’s pay-to-play laws). The repeal of this ordinance is part of a trend of New Jersey counties and municipalities that have revised or rescinded local ordinances in an effort to simplify the government-contracting process. Will other municipalities follow Plainfield’s lead?

When it Comes to Pay-to-Play, Not All Political Recipients are Created Equal

If any New Jersey State contractor or potential State contractor out there ever thought that it didn’t need to put political-activity and pay-to-play compliance at the top of its “To Do” list, we have a cautionary tale for you.

Earlier this week, after losing out on the opportunity to perform two separate NJDOT contracts worth just over $7 million, the Superior Court, Appellate Division in Mercer County held that a paving company would remain ineligible for New Jersey state government contracts through the end of Governor Chris Christie’s current term of office because the company made a $500 contribution to a county party committee. Under New Jersey’s pay-to-play laws, contributions that exceed $300 per calendar year to a county political party committee will disqualify the contributor for contracts with the State of New Jersey Executive Branch. In this case, the devil is in the details – the company wrote its check payable to the “Somerset County Republican Org to Elect Provenzano,” referencing a candidate for County Sheriff. The contribution was made in connection with an event sponsored by the Somerset County Republican Organization, which provided attendees with the option of making their checks payable to different recipients. Unfortunately for the paving company, the payee name on its check was ambiguous and was eventually deposited by the Somerset County Republican Organization. If the company check had been more clear, or had been deposited by the County Sheriff candidate (or had been made payable to the County Freeholder candidates that were also listed on the invitation), the paving company would not have been declared ineligible for contracts with the State of New Jersey. The company only realized the implications of the contribution after the close of the 30-day refund period, and thus finds itself sitting on the sidelines for the remainder of Governor Christie’s current term of office.

This case reaffirms that although both contributors and recipients sometimes make mistakes, New Jersey’s Executive Branch pay-to-play restrictions provide no room for “inadvertent” contributions except during the limited 30-day refund period. In this case, the President of the company “signed the check as a matter of office routine since he signs virtually all company checks every month.” There is nothing routine when it comes to New Jersey pay-to-play restrictions. What is the moral of the story?  If you hold a State contract with the New Jersey Executive Branch and are thinking of making a political contribution, be informed about the State’s stringent pay-to-play laws and implement careful compliance and oversight policies for political contributions. Make it crystal clear who the recipient of your contribution is.  Don’t let lax compliance and an inadvertent $500 contribution cost you $7 million in contracts.

Calling all New Jersey Government Contractors: What is your Plan for Political Activity Compliance in Anticipation of the 2017 Gubernatorial Election?

With only 19 days until the presidential election and the final debate being held tonight, most of the country is focused on national politics. Although the presidential election may be taking center stage, now is the time for companies to focus on their New Jersey political-activity compliance.

We are currently within the 18-month period before the inauguration of New Jersey’s next governor, which means that a contribution made today may impact your company’s eligibility for contracts with the State of New Jersey for years to come. If your company or even one covered individual (including officers, shareholders, equity partners or their spouses, civil-union partners and resident children) contributes more than $300 to a gubernatorial candidate or certain other political recipients, your company could be declared ineligible for contracts with the State of New Jersey through January of 2022!

Focusing on political-activity compliance is important for all companies, but it is especially important if your company has recently gone through a merger, conducted a re-organization, hired new officers or partners, promoted individuals within your company to new roles or simply needs a refresher. If you have no policy is place, it is not too late to adopt one before New Jersey’s gubernatorial election kicks into full swing and you find yourselves ineligible to compete for government-contracting opportunities.

Pay-to-Play for New Jersey Public-Sector Labor Unions?

New Jersey’s pay-to-play laws are perhaps the most stringent in the country, with a web of overlapping laws, executive orders, and ordinances covering procurement contracts and redevelopment agreements with all levels of government. As the law stands now, labor union collective-bargaining agreements are not covered by any of these pay-to-play restrictions. (Governor Christie issued an Executive Order in 2010 that would have expanded existing pay-to-play restrictions to cover labor unions, but this Executive Order was struck down because it didn’t advance any then-existing legislative act or constitutional mandate.)

But there have been renewed calls in recent days to enact Senate Bill 341, which would limit the political contributions of those labor unions that enter into collective negotiations agreements with the State of New Jersey, or with New Jersey counties and municipalities.  Unlike current statewide Executive Branch pay-to-play restrictions, the proposed legislation provides for monetary penalties for violations. This legislation raises the possibility of a future amendment of New Jersey’s current statewide Executive Branch pay-to-play restrictions to provide for monetary penalties in the traditional procurement context as well. If passed, these new union pay-to-play restrictions would represent a profound transformation in New Jersey’s pay-to-play regime and for New Jersey politics as a whole.

New Jersey’s 2016 Primary: Potential Pitfalls of Per Election & Pay-to-Play Limits

New Jersey held its 2016 primary election on Tuesday, June 7, 2016. While most of the focus has been on the presidential primary, individuals and entities that contribute in connection with New Jersey state and local elections need to keep the following in mind:

  • New Jersey campaign finance law sets “per election” limits for contributions to candidate committees; however, the limit does not automatically reset the day after the primary election. Rather, the 2016 primary election cycle remains open until Friday, June 24, 2016 (candidates are required to file a 20-day post-election report with ELEC on Monday, June 27, 2016). So, any contribution made between the primary election and June 24, 2016 will count toward the 2016 primary and not the 2016 general. This is an important consideration if a contributor is concerned with pay-to-play compliance and wants to limit contributions to a particular candidate to no more than $300 per election.
    • If a contributor wants a contribution to count toward the 2016 primary, the contributor should make sure that the check arrives before June 24, 2016 and that the recipient committee will report the contribution in connection with the 2016 primary.
    • If a contributor wants a contribution to count toward the 2016 general, the contributor should wait to send the check after the June 24 “cut off” date to avoid any confusion (and the possibility of exceeding a pay-to-play limit).
  • New Jersey campaign finance law sets “per calendar” year limits for contributions to party committees, PACs and legislative leadership committees. So, if a contributor is concerned with pay-to-play compliance and wants to limit contributions to $300 or less, the limit does not re-set now that the primary is over.
  • Some New Jersey pay-to-play ordinances set “per calendar year,” “per contract” or “per election cycle” limits for contributions to candidates. Some even prohibit contributions in any amount during certain periods of time. So, if your company does business with a particular county or municipality or wishes to remain eligible for future contracts with a particular county or municipality, do not assume that because the 2016 primary election is over, it is now safe to write another check.

Less Than One Month: NJ ELEC Broadens Annual Pay-to-Play Form & Requires Companies to Disclose Additional Information

Recent changes in the annual filing requirement for companies doing business with local, county or state government in New Jersey may make the process for completing this year’s ELEC Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE”) more complicated and time consuming. Although ELEC has yet to issue guidance on these additional requirements, government vendors must still electronically file the disclosure form by the March 30 submission deadline.

In effect since 2006, Form BE requires every company that receives payments of $50,000 or more from New Jersey government entities to disclose those contracts as well as its reportable New Jersey political contributions. All businesses that receive such payments must file regardless of whether the company or certain associated people have made any reportable contributions, but the level of detail required by Form BE depends on whether you have any contributions to report.

There are two new requirements for the 2015 reporting year (due March 30):

  • Fair-and-Open Check Box Requirement: Check a box to indicate whether each contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process”; and
  • Certification Requirement: Certify that the statements and/or information contained in Form BE are true and acknowledge that if any of the statements or information are willfully false that you may be subject to punishment.

Expect completing your 2015 Form BE to be more time consuming than in the past. Here are some obstacles to be on the alert for:

  • Businesses may find it challenging and time consuming to identify whether a contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process” given that your 2015 Form BE may cover long-term contracts that could very well have been awarded years ago.
  • In many cases it will be unclear how vendors should classify Executive Branch contracts awarded pursuant to a competitive process because the phrase “fair-and-open process” is a term of art with respect to county, municipal and legislative contracts.
  • In past years, ELEC asked the person filing Form BE to simply “acknowledge” that he or she was familiar with the information contained in the Form BE. Now, ELEC is asking the person filing Form BE to certify to the accuracy of the statement and to acknowledge that he or she may be subject to punishment for willfully false information.
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