2016 Presidential Conventions: What Delegates and Attendees Need to Know

With the 2016 presidential conventions underway and as the November presidential election draws near, this post is part of a series on what different entities and groups need to know about their political activity as the 2016 election approaches. This post examines the rules governing contributions made to convention delegates under federal law.

Permissible Contributions to Delegates

Events and gifts paid for by the host cities (in this case, Cleveland, Ohio and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) may be accepted by delegates. It is also permissible for a delegate to accept any gift paid for by any unit of federal, state, or local government. Delegates are also permitted to accept meals, lodging, entertainment, and transportation from a political organization in connection with a campaign or fundraising event that the organization is sponsoring.

Classification of Funds Raised and Spent for Delegate Activity

Funds raised and spent for the purpose of furthering delegate selection are considered contributions and expenditures made for the purpose of influencing a federal election. There are no limitations on the monetary amount of contributions from permissible sources to delegates for the purpose of furthering their own selection as delegates. Once selected, travel and subsistence expenses related to the delegate selection process and the national nominating convention are considered expenditures. Additional considerations may arise when a federal candidate or officeholder attends the convention as a delegate.

Who is Prohibited from Contributing to a Delegate?

Individual delegates may not accept contributions from sources prohibited from making contributions in connection with federal elections. These sources include:

  • Corporations (including banks, trade associations, and non-profit corporations);
  • Labor organizations;
  • Foreign nationals or businesses (except lawful permanent residents); and
  • Federal government contractors, such as partnerships and sole proprietors with federal contracts.

With the Republican National Convention underway and the Democratic National Convention is only a few days away, it is not too late for delegates and their potential supporters to be aware of the rules.

Babatunde Odubekun, a summer associate at Genova Burns, assisted in the preparation of this post.