New York State Announces Broad Set of Ethics and Campaign-Finance Reforms

Late last week, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and State legislative leaders announced agreement on a broad set of ethics and campaign-finance reforms focused on increased disclosure, transparency, and public trust.

Pursuant to this reform package:

  1. Super PACs (also known as Independent Expenditure Committees) may make and receive unlimited contributions so long as they do not coordinate with a political candidate. New York’s agreement expands the definition of coordination in this context to include the retention of a common vendor, the employment of a candidate’s former staffers, and the sharing or rental of common space. This agreement also increases disclosure requirements for Super PACs.
  2. Any public officer convicted of corruption is precluded from collecting a public pension.
  3. New disclosure requirements will be put in place for political consultants who represent both political officeholders or candidates and also private-sector clients with government business.
  4. Various reporting thresholds have been lowered under the State’s lobbying laws, including a reduction from $50,000 to $15,000 of the reporting threshold for organizations that lobby on their own behalf.
  5. 501(c)(4) social-welfare organizations are permitted to engage in political activities so long as political activity does not become the primary purpose of the organization. In contrast, 501(c)(3) charitable organizations are strictly prohibited from engaging in any political activity. Under New York’s agreement, 501(c)(4)s will be required to disclose funding and support received from 501(c)(3)s.  Additionally, a 501(c)(4) will be required to disclose its funding sources if they engage in political activities.