Deadline for New Jersey’s Annual Pay-to-Play Disclosure is Approaching: Is Your Company Ready to File?

After ELEC sent out its reminder email on March 6, we are reproducing below a Genova Burns LLC client alert that was distributed last week for any potential filers who may require additional information about the annual pay-to-play disclosure.

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission (“ELEC”) requires each business entity that received payments of $50,000 or more (in the aggregate) as a result of government contracts during the 2016 calendar year to electronically file a Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE“) with ELEC no later than Thursday, March 30, 2017.

The obligation to file arises whenever payments from New Jersey government entities reach the $50,000 threshold. This includes contracts with the State of New Jersey Executive and Legislative branches, counties, municipalities, boards of education, fire districts, and independent authorities, regardless of method of award.

Additionally, detailed contract and contribution information must be disclosed whenever the business entity or a covered individual made a “reportable” contribution during 2016. A contribution is “reportable” when it exceeds $300 per reporting period. In light of these requirements, it is necessary to review personal political contributions made by a business entity’s partners, officers, and directors (and certain members of their families). Additionally, because of varying election cycles, it may be necessary to review contributions made over the course of several years to determine whether any 2016 contributions are reportable.

Companies that fail to file on time may be subject to monetary penalties. To ensure a timely and accurate filing, companies that have yet to begin preparing Form BE should not delay.

Genova Burns LLC can help your company comply with the Form BE filing requirements. Contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq., Chair of the Corporate Political Activity Law Group, at rfreed@genovaburns.com or 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at akelin@genovaburns.com or 973-646-3267.

Plainfield Repeals Local Pay-to-Play Ordinance

New Jersey is home to a multitude of overlapping pay-to play laws. The State has a default statute covering pay-to-play restrictions at the municipal level. In 2006, however, the State Legislature allowed municipalities to craft their own pay-to-play ordinances further restricting certain political contributions from vendors. Although these local ordinances are supposed to be “consistent with the themes” of New Jersey’s statewide pay-to-play restrictions, variations exist among the local ordinance in effect in more than 100 municipalities across the State.

As of last week, the number of municipalities with local pay-to-play ordinances in effect dropped by one when, in a 4-3 vote, the Plainfield Municipal Council voted to repeal its 2011 pay-to-play ordinance. Until recently, Plainfield had a stringent pay-to-play ordinance in effect. Under the old ordinance, covered contributors were subject to reduced contribution limits for municipal candidates and political party committees, as well as for county political party committees and PACs that regularly engage in the support of Plainfield municipal or Union county elections. Additionally, all contributions were prohibited once negotiations for a contract began. Without the ordinance, the State’s default pay-to-play laws will be in force in Plainfield. This means, if the City of Plainfield awards contracts pursuant to a “fair and open” process, vendors may contribute up to $2,600 per election to a candidate for Plainfield municipal office. If, however, the City of Plainfield does not use a “fair and open” process, vendors must adhere to the reduced pay-to-play limit of $300 per election to a candidate for or holder of Plainfield municipal office and $300 per calendar year to a Plainfield municipal party committee.

Proponents of the repeal argue that this will bring more transparency to the political process by encouraging direct contributions to candidates and party committees instead of PACs (a sentiment that echoes ELEC’s recent calls to revisit the State’s pay-to-play laws). The repeal of this ordinance is part of a trend of New Jersey counties and municipalities that have revised or rescinded local ordinances in an effort to simplify the government-contracting process. Will other municipalities follow Plainfield’s lead?

Less Than One Month: NJ ELEC Broadens Annual Pay-to-Play Form & Requires Companies to Disclose Additional Information

Recent changes in the annual filing requirement for companies doing business with local, county or state government in New Jersey may make the process for completing this year’s ELEC Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE”) more complicated and time consuming. Although ELEC has yet to issue guidance on these additional requirements, government vendors must still electronically file the disclosure form by the March 30 submission deadline.

In effect since 2006, Form BE requires every company that receives payments of $50,000 or more from New Jersey government entities to disclose those contracts as well as its reportable New Jersey political contributions. All businesses that receive such payments must file regardless of whether the company or certain associated people have made any reportable contributions, but the level of detail required by Form BE depends on whether you have any contributions to report.

There are two new requirements for the 2015 reporting year (due March 30):

  • Fair-and-Open Check Box Requirement: Check a box to indicate whether each contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process”; and
  • Certification Requirement: Certify that the statements and/or information contained in Form BE are true and acknowledge that if any of the statements or information are willfully false that you may be subject to punishment.

Expect completing your 2015 Form BE to be more time consuming than in the past. Here are some obstacles to be on the alert for:

  • Businesses may find it challenging and time consuming to identify whether a contract was awarded pursuant to a “fair-and-open-process” given that your 2015 Form BE may cover long-term contracts that could very well have been awarded years ago.
  • In many cases it will be unclear how vendors should classify Executive Branch contracts awarded pursuant to a competitive process because the phrase “fair-and-open process” is a term of art with respect to county, municipal and legislative contracts.
  • In past years, ELEC asked the person filing Form BE to simply “acknowledge” that he or she was familiar with the information contained in the Form BE. Now, ELEC is asking the person filing Form BE to certify to the accuracy of the statement and to acknowledge that he or she may be subject to punishment for willfully false information.

Calling All New Jersey Government Contractors: The Clock is Ticking . . . Are you Ready for the March 30th Pay-to-Play Filing Deadline?

As we have previously discussed here, the New Jersey Pay-to-Play Annual Disclosure filing deadline is right around the corner.

Any entity that received payments of $50,000 or more as a result of payments from a New Jersey government entity during the 2014 calendar year is required to file Form BE electronically with the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission no later than Monday, March 30, 2015.

Not sure whether your company is required to file Form BE? If you are not sure whether you are required to file Form BE, you may want to start your information-gathering process by compiling all of your New Jersey government-contract information. As you compile this information, please keep in mind that:

• Contracts with bi-state agencies, such as the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey and the Delaware River Port Authority, are not included.

• Contracts with Boards of Education and Fire Districts are included.

• The $50,000 threshold is an aggregate threshold – so, if you hold ten (10) contracts with New Jersey government entities and received payments totaling $10,000 for each contract during the 2014 calendar year, you are required to file Form BE.

Not sure whether you have any political contributions to report? Whether you need to file a “detailed” Form BE setting forth both contract and contribution information depends on whether you have any political contributions to report. So, if you know that you exceeded the $50,000 threshold and are not sure whether you have any contributions to report, you may want to start your information-gathering process by compiling contribution information. As you compile this information, please keep in mind that:

• The “reportable” threshold is $300 per election when the contribution was made to a candidate committee (election cycles may span multiple calendar years) and $300 per calendar year when the contribution was made to a party committee, political action committee/continuing political committee or a legislative leadership committee.

• The group of covered contributors is broader than under other pay-to-play laws (in addition to surveying owners of your company or firm, you will also need to survey officers and directors).

• The group of covered political recipients is broader than under other pay-to-play laws (with the exception of contributions to federal recipients, you are required to disclose contributions to all other New Jersey political recipients from the State level down to the school board level).

Not sure whether you are on the right track to file a timely and accurate disclosure? You still have time to gather all relevant information to make that determination. The key is to designate a point person within your organization who is responsible for gathering all contract and contribution information.

Remember – you may need to reach out to various individuals within your company so the sooner you begin to gather the information, the better!

Calling All Government Contractors: Upcoming New Jersey Political Contribution Disclosure Form

For government contractors, the start of a new year brings with it a host of filing requirements in many states along the Northeast Corridor. Although some states (such as New York and Connecticut) do not impose annual or semi-annual filing requirements on government contractors, other states such as New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland require government contractors to file reports. This is the final part of our series of blog posts that focuses on the upcoming filing deadlines in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. These reports generally require government contractors to disclose certain information about their political contributions, but no two filing requirements are the same. As your company prepares to put its best foot forward in 2015, this series will share what you need to know about these disclosure requirements and some compliance tips to make sure that your company is accurately capturing all relevant information.

New Jersey (Filing Deadline – March 30, 2015)

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission (“ELEC”) requires each business entity that received payments of $50,000 or more (in the aggregate) as a result of government contracts during the 2014 calendar year to electronically file a Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE”) with ELEC no later than Monday, March 30, 2015.

Compliance TipAll businesses that received payments in excess of the $50,000 threshold must file Form BE. Whether a company is required to file a “detailed” Form BE (setting forth contract and contribution information) depends on whether the company and/or certain associated individuals made any “reportable” contributions (a contribution in excess of $300) during the 2014 calendar year.

Will 2015 be The Year for Pay-to-Play Reform in New Jersey?

New Jersey’s pay-to-play laws have been described as a “dizzyingly complex array of statutes, ordinances and executive orders.” New Jersey currently has different laws in effect that apply to State government contracts, State redevelopment agreements, county, municipal and legislative contracts, Board of Education contracts (where Boards of Education are receiving state aid) and a statewide disclosure law that applies on both a pre-contract and annual basis. This list of laws also does not include the hundreds of local ordinances that are currently in effect at the municipal and county levels of government in New Jersey, nor does it include municipal redevelopment ordinances, (which may regulate political activity by redevelopers and their consultants) and land use ordinances (which may cover those seeking land use approvals in connection with development projects).

Although ELEC has been pushing for reform for years, with the recent Atlantic County pay-to-play decision, 2015 may just be the year that existing laws are streamlined to eliminate the multifarious patchwork of ordinances, which currently vary from locality to locality. Until that time, however, government contractors need to stay on top of the varying (and sometimes conflicting) labyrinth of laws, including compliance with ELEC’s upcoming Pay-to-Play Annual Disclosure filing requirement.

Contributions by New Jersey Government Contractors Increased Dramatically in 2013: Will Pay-to-Play Reform Follow?

Late last month, ELEC issued its 2013 Annual Report, which includes an analysis of the Pay-to-Play Annual Disclosures (Form BE) filed by New Jersey government contractors. Although New Jersey has stringent pay-to-play restrictions in effect at virtually all levels of government, ELEC reported that contributions by public contractors jumped to $10.1 million in 2013 (up more than $2 million from 2012). Despite this increase, ELEC advised in its May ELEC-Tronic Newsletter that “overall contributions still are down 39 percent from a peak of $16.4 million in 2007.”

Given that contributions by New Jersey government contractors increased significantly in 2013, it raises the question of whether pay-to-play restrictions are working. Although the law has not changed in nearly five (5) years, changes may be taking place on the local level to spur an increase in giving. Perhaps more local government entities are moving to a “fair and open process”, which allows vendors to contribute up to the full limits of New Jersey campaign finance law during the term of a contract. Perhaps more local government entities are adopting less stringent pay-to-play restrictions, which contain higher contribution limits during both the pre-contracting period and during the term of a contract itself. Perhaps the increase is simply due to the fact that contributions to legislative candidates generally fall outside the scope of pay-to-play restrictions and 2013 was a big legislative election year. Or, perhaps the increase is based on the fact that more government contractors have become aware of their filing obligations. No matter the reason, there is still a push for pay-to-play reform in the Garden State. Despite the fact that legislation was introduced in the New Jersey Senate over a year ago, New Jersey’s statewide pay-to-play restrictions have not changed since 2008.

Now that the 2013 legislative elections are over, will 2014 be the year for reform?

Independent Spending in NJ’s 2013 Elections Reaches a Record-Breaking High

Last week the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission announced  “[a]n unprecedented explosion of independent special interest spending pushed the cost of the 2013 state elections to an all-time high . . .”  Although final numbers won’t be available until January, reports filed with ELEC indicate that spending on New Jersey’s 2013 elections reached a record $129 million.  Special interest groups are responsible for spending nearly $41 million independent of parties and candidates on state campaigns during the recent election cycle.  This constitutes approximately 32% of the total amount of money spent statewide (compared to .3% in the 2005 and 15% in 2009).  Thus, the numbers have doubled since New Jersey’s last gubernatorial election.

This year marks the first election in which the governor’s office and all 120 seats of the legislature were up for grabs since the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Citizens UnitedSome argue that decision spurred this dramatic growth in independent spending, although it is worth noting that, unlike federal law prior to Citizens United, New Jersey campaign finance law did not restrict independent spending by corporations.

Yet it is apparent that Citizens United marks at least a psychological sea change that has driven up spending by independent entities and dramatically changed election dynamics in the Garden State.

ELEC Issues August Newsletter

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission has issued its August newsletter. The newsletter discusses the role of public financing in New Jersey’s gubernatorial election, trends on independent spending by outside groups and fundraising by the “Big Six” Committees in the second quarter of 2013. The newsletter also discusses the pending appeal in Wagner v. Federal Election Commission (a challenge to the long-standing federal contractor ban) and the impact that the ultimate decision in that case may have on New Jersey’s own pay-to-play laws.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (DC) is scheduled to hear oral arguments in Wagner v. FEC on Monday, September 30, 2013.