Is the Time Ripe for New Jersey Pay-to-Play Reform?

For more than a decade, New Jersey has had in place a series of pay-to-play laws that impose reduced contribution limits and heightened disclosure requirements for government contractors. The goal of these laws is to ensure fair contracting procedures and to remove favoritism from the procurement process.

But are these laws working as intended when seemingly innocent mistakes leading to relatively small political contributions remove otherwise qualified and competitive bidders from government contracts? News last month that a paving company was disqualified from $7 million in New Jersey Executive Branch contracts because of a $500 political contribution has government contractors throughout the State understandably concerned about their own compliance procedures. The disproportionate effect of a relatively small political contribution has highlighted the need to reform New Jersey’s pay-to-play laws.

And Jeff Brindle, the Executive Director of the New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission, agrees. The need for reform is not a new issue, but the dramatic nature of this ineligibility determination may provide the impetus to begin this process in earnest.

In the current legal landscape and a blockbuster New Jersey election year that will see the election of a new governor as well as 120 State legislative races, government contractors need to focus on their pay-to-play compliance. Merely assuming that you are in compliance is simply not good enough, when a contribution of only a few hundred dollars can disqualify your company from millions of dollars of contracts. At this point in the election cycle, even one unintentional contribution can disqualify your company for up to 5 ½ years and, starting in April, refunds will not cure an excessive contribution once we have entered the 60 days preceding the 2017 primary election.

Genova Burns LLC has been at the forefront of pay-to-play compliance since New Jersey’s law was enacted more than a decade ago. If you are unsure of your compliance procedures, Genova Burns LLC can assist you in navigating the current legal landscape as well as any reforms that the future may bring. If you have any questions or would like to discuss your pay-to-play compliance program, please contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq. at 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at 973-646-3267.

Deadline for New Jersey’s Annual Pay-to-Play Disclosure is Approaching: Is Your Company Ready to File?

After ELEC sent out its reminder email on March 6, we are reproducing below a Genova Burns LLC client alert that was distributed last week for any potential filers who may require additional information about the annual pay-to-play disclosure.

The New Jersey Election Law Enforcement Commission (“ELEC”) requires each business entity that received payments of $50,000 or more (in the aggregate) as a result of government contracts during the 2016 calendar year to electronically file a Business Entity Annual Statement (“Form BE“) with ELEC no later than Thursday, March 30, 2017.

The obligation to file arises whenever payments from New Jersey government entities reach the $50,000 threshold. This includes contracts with the State of New Jersey Executive and Legislative branches, counties, municipalities, boards of education, fire districts, and independent authorities, regardless of method of award.

Additionally, detailed contract and contribution information must be disclosed whenever the business entity or a covered individual made a “reportable” contribution during 2016. A contribution is “reportable” when it exceeds $300 per reporting period. In light of these requirements, it is necessary to review personal political contributions made by a business entity’s partners, officers, and directors (and certain members of their families). Additionally, because of varying election cycles, it may be necessary to review contributions made over the course of several years to determine whether any 2016 contributions are reportable.

Companies that fail to file on time may be subject to monetary penalties. To ensure a timely and accurate filing, companies that have yet to begin preparing Form BE should not delay.

Genova Burns LLC can help your company comply with the Form BE filing requirements. Contact Rebecca Moll Freed, Esq., Chair of the Corporate Political Activity Law Group, at rfreed@genovaburns.com or 973-230-2075 or Avi D. Kelin, Esq. at akelin@genovaburns.com or 973-646-3267.

Pay-to-Play Resolutions

As we approach the end of the first work week of 2016, companies should be thinking about their “pay-to-play resolutions” in the upcoming year. New Jersey is home to numerous and varied pay-to-play restrictions. One misstep can have severe consequences. New Jersey’s pay-to-play restrictions may make your head spin, but any company that does business (or wants to do business) with the New Jersey government needs to make compliance with these laws part of its 2016 business plan.

Although many companies think that they have their political activity compliance program under control, companies often ignore these key facts:

  1. The laws change;
  2. Similar laws are often interpreted differently; and
  3. Those covered by pay-to-play restrictions within your organization may change from year to year as people join your team, leave your team or change positions within your company.

As 2012 came to a close, we discussed 2013 Pay-to-Play Resolutions. Given, however, that we are now in a Presidential election year and New Jersey’s gubernatorial election is not far behind, it is important to address pay-to-play resolutions once again. As we enter this busy political season with many hotly contested issues (and races), thinking that individuals within your company are going to sit on the sidelines is not realistic. If you are a government contractor (or hope to be one in the future), now is the perfect time to make the adoption of a meaningful political activity compliance program a key part of your list of New Year’s resolutions.

 

Contributions by New Jersey Government Contractors Increased Dramatically in 2013: Will Pay-to-Play Reform Follow?

Late last month, ELEC issued its 2013 Annual Report, which includes an analysis of the Pay-to-Play Annual Disclosures (Form BE) filed by New Jersey government contractors. Although New Jersey has stringent pay-to-play restrictions in effect at virtually all levels of government, ELEC reported that contributions by public contractors jumped to $10.1 million in 2013 (up more than $2 million from 2012). Despite this increase, ELEC advised in its May ELEC-Tronic Newsletter that “overall contributions still are down 39 percent from a peak of $16.4 million in 2007.”

Given that contributions by New Jersey government contractors increased significantly in 2013, it raises the question of whether pay-to-play restrictions are working. Although the law has not changed in nearly five (5) years, changes may be taking place on the local level to spur an increase in giving. Perhaps more local government entities are moving to a “fair and open process”, which allows vendors to contribute up to the full limits of New Jersey campaign finance law during the term of a contract. Perhaps more local government entities are adopting less stringent pay-to-play restrictions, which contain higher contribution limits during both the pre-contracting period and during the term of a contract itself. Perhaps the increase is simply due to the fact that contributions to legislative candidates generally fall outside the scope of pay-to-play restrictions and 2013 was a big legislative election year. Or, perhaps the increase is based on the fact that more government contractors have become aware of their filing obligations. No matter the reason, there is still a push for pay-to-play reform in the Garden State. Despite the fact that legislation was introduced in the New Jersey Senate over a year ago, New Jersey’s statewide pay-to-play restrictions have not changed since 2008.

Now that the 2013 legislative elections are over, will 2014 be the year for reform?