2016 Presidential Conventions: What Congress Members and Attendees Need to Know

With the 2016 presidential conventions underway and as the November presidential election draws near, this post is part of a series on what different entities and groups need to know about their political activity as the 2016 election approaches. This post examines congressional gift rules that may be implicated during the conventions.

Congressional gift rules permit Members and staff who are convention delegates to attend convention events that are open to all convention delegates or to all delegates from their state or region.

Generally, Members of the House of Representatives and their staff may accept any gift paid for by the host cities (in this case, Cleveland, Ohio and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). Additionally, a Member or staff person may accept a non-cash gift valued at less than $50 from any individual who is not a registered federal lobbyist, registered foreign agent, or an entity that employs or retains such individuals.

Impermissible, however, is Member or staff acceptance of a gift, provided by the host city, that was specifically or informally designated by a donor for distribution to Members or staff. The following non-exhaustive list of gifts may not be given to or received by Members of the House of Representatives or their staff:

  • Meals;
  • Entertainment;
  • Transportation;
  • Services; and
  • Anything of monetary value except as provided in the rule.

Staff and Members who are convention delegates may accept invitations to events and other gifts that are offered to all of the convention delegates or to, for example, all of the convention delegates from their state.

Additional general exceptions to the normal prohibition rules may also be relevant during the convention, including the widely-attended-event exception. This exception allows event sponsors to invite Staff and Members to attend an event that is attended by at least twenty-five individuals from outside Congress who are interested in a given issue and which is related to the official duties or representative function of elected officials.

As the 2016 conventions will be attended by many people subject to the congressional gift rules, it is important to keep these restrictions in mind as convention events are held.

Babatunde Odubekun, a summer associate at Genova Burns, assisted in the preparation of this post.

2016 Presidential Conventions: What Delegates and Attendees Need to Know

With the 2016 presidential conventions underway and as the November presidential election draws near, this post is part of a series on what different entities and groups need to know about their political activity as the 2016 election approaches. This post examines the rules governing contributions made to convention delegates under federal law.

Permissible Contributions to Delegates

Events and gifts paid for by the host cities (in this case, Cleveland, Ohio and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) may be accepted by delegates. It is also permissible for a delegate to accept any gift paid for by any unit of federal, state, or local government. Delegates are also permitted to accept meals, lodging, entertainment, and transportation from a political organization in connection with a campaign or fundraising event that the organization is sponsoring.

Classification of Funds Raised and Spent for Delegate Activity

Funds raised and spent for the purpose of furthering delegate selection are considered contributions and expenditures made for the purpose of influencing a federal election. There are no limitations on the monetary amount of contributions from permissible sources to delegates for the purpose of furthering their own selection as delegates. Once selected, travel and subsistence expenses related to the delegate selection process and the national nominating convention are considered expenditures. Additional considerations may arise when a federal candidate or officeholder attends the convention as a delegate.

Who is Prohibited from Contributing to a Delegate?

Individual delegates may not accept contributions from sources prohibited from making contributions in connection with federal elections. These sources include:

  • Corporations (including banks, trade associations, and non-profit corporations);
  • Labor organizations;
  • Foreign nationals or businesses (except lawful permanent residents); and
  • Federal government contractors, such as partnerships and sole proprietors with federal contracts.

With the Republican National Convention underway and the Democratic National Convention is only a few days away, it is not too late for delegates and their potential supporters to be aware of the rules.

Babatunde Odubekun, a summer associate at Genova Burns, assisted in the preparation of this post.

Independence, Coordination & Super PACs in the 2016 Presidential Election

Yesterday we celebrated Independence Day. In the next three weeks, the Nation will focus on the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. We cannot turn on the television without catching a political ad. Some ads will be run by the candidates themselves. Based on recent reports filed with the Federal Election Commission (“FEC”), there is a good chance that many ads will be run by Super PACs.

Although Super PACs are required to disclose their donors, it is not always clear who is behind a Super PAC ad and whether a Super PAC is truly independent from a candidate, a party or their agents. The FEC has, therefore, adopted a three-prong test to determine whether a Super PAC is acting independently and is, therefore, entitled to receive unlimited contributions.

Under the FEC’s coordination test, when an election-related communication (content prong) has been paid for by a third-party (payment prong), the FEC will ask the following questions (conduct prong) to determine whether the ad was coordinated:

  • Was the communication created, produced or distributed at the request or suggestion of the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Was the candidate, party committee or their agents materially involved in decisions related to the ad’s content, intended audience, mode of communications, etc.?
  • Were there substantial discussions between the Super PAC and the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Does the Super PAC share a common vendor with the candidate, party or their agents?
  • Does the Super PAC employ an employee or independent contractor who worked for the candidate or party committee during the previous 120 days?

Because proving an ad was not coordinated, isn’t always as easy as 1-2-3, it is not too late for Super PACs involved in the 2016 presidential election to develop policies, procedures and protocols to help protect against potential allegations of coordination.

Pay-to-Play Resolutions

As we approach the end of the first work week of 2016, companies should be thinking about their “pay-to-play resolutions” in the upcoming year. New Jersey is home to numerous and varied pay-to-play restrictions. One misstep can have severe consequences. New Jersey’s pay-to-play restrictions may make your head spin, but any company that does business (or wants to do business) with the New Jersey government needs to make compliance with these laws part of its 2016 business plan.

Although many companies think that they have their political activity compliance program under control, companies often ignore these key facts:

  1. The laws change;
  2. Similar laws are often interpreted differently; and
  3. Those covered by pay-to-play restrictions within your organization may change from year to year as people join your team, leave your team or change positions within your company.

As 2012 came to a close, we discussed 2013 Pay-to-Play Resolutions. Given, however, that we are now in a Presidential election year and New Jersey’s gubernatorial election is not far behind, it is important to address pay-to-play resolutions once again. As we enter this busy political season with many hotly contested issues (and races), thinking that individuals within your company are going to sit on the sidelines is not realistic. If you are a government contractor (or hope to be one in the future), now is the perfect time to make the adoption of a meaningful political activity compliance program a key part of your list of New Year’s resolutions.